Other Media

Legal eagles protect forest habitat

Monday, May 2, 2016

Originally published at: 

Our forests are under pressure. Victoria is the most cleared state in Australia, so the forests left there are crucial habitat for wildlife like the greater glider and yellow-bellied glider. New species are still being discovered in our forests, such as the East Gippsland Galaxias fish. That makes it all the more shocking that state logging agency VicForests doesn't do what the law requires them to when it comes to checking for threatened species in areas slated for logging.

Danya Jacobs is Environmental Justice Australia's Forest Defence Lawyer. She uses her legal skills to defend patches of forest that might otherwise be lost to logging. From last-minute injunctions to educating citizen scientists so their evidence is courtroom quality, Danya has a wealth of legal experience and a passion for forests. Danya will be sharing the story of our forest defence work and the challenges she works to overcome at a Forest Briefing.

Large trees under threat: researchers

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Originally published at: 

While much of the focus lately has been the impact humans are having on the largest, and most spectacular reef in the world, slightly inland we are hurting one of our other greatest natural beauties.

Scientists from James Cook University and the Australian National University have released a paper detailing the threat to large, old trees.

Rare species are more important than originally believed, according to new research

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Originally published at: 

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .

"We measured the ecosystem services provided by each species as determined from their key morphological and physiological features," Baraloto said. "The results of this study are compelling because we find consistent effects of rare reducing the functional diversity of communities across three very different groups of organisms."

The researchers focused on the tropics, where a large proportion of species are rare and high rates of species loss are expected in the near future. They examined stream fish from the Brazilian Amazon, birds from the Australian Wet Tropics, and rainforest trees from French Guiana, where Baraloto has devoted much of his career. To calculate potential impacts from species loss within an ecosystem, the researchers created simulations of species removal, comparing the disruptions caused by the loss of rare species versus more .

For example, the researchers point out the importance of Protium giganteum, a rare species of rainforest tree in French Guiana. The tree has thick leaves and thick bark that provide resistance to drought and fire. These trees help maintain forest cover and other services to mitigate predicted increases in drought and fire intensity that are brought on by climate changes.

Ultimately, it comes down to balance. The disproportionate contributions of rare species can help ecosystems buffer the disturbances currently occurring on the planet. According to the researchers, this reality can no longer be ignored because —while long-valued for their biodiversity and aesthetic values—are even more important than originally believed.

Explore further: Rare species perform unique roles, even in diverse ecosystems

More information: Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2016.0084



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.

Victoria’s giant trees: a contemporary survey

Friday, April 1, 2016

Originally published at: 

The huge base of 'Darejo', Eucalyptus denticulata-14.3m in girth

Victoria's largest tree paper published in the Victorian Naturalist. This recently published paper is a thorough documentation of Victoria's giant trees - and sadly their loss. It suggests the government should protect all trees over 3m diameter or the giants will be lost in our landscape.

DELWP to investigate VicForests for logging protected rainforests

Friday, April 1, 2016

Originally published at: 

For the third time in as many months, a Gippsland-based environmental organisation has blown the whistle on VicForests for logging potentially protected rainforest in the region.

On Thursday, the Goongerah Environment Centre (GECO) announced it had blown the whistle on Victoria’s commercial logging business, VicForests, triggering an investigation by the Department of Environment Land Water and Planning (DELWP).

In a statement released yesterday, GECO stated that its recent surveys in East Gippsland revealed logging had occurred in rainforest buffer zones where rare and endangered species had been identified.

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