Science and Reports

As well as all the moral and economic arguments against destroying nature and forests, there are also endless research reports and scientific findings that show our governments are deliberately denying empirical evidence. To deny sound, peer reviewed science is as absurd as declaring the world is flat. Environmental arguments are not merely emotional bleatings as industry likes to portray. The reports cited here are merely the tip of the iceberg currently being ignored for political expedience.

Valuing Victoria's Parks

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

This new government report details the ecosystem services provided by the states parks and reserves. It includes the water and carbon values, biodiversity protection, recreational benefits and employment, and loads more. If this is what a small section of Victoria’s natural areas can offer – just imagine how much more benefit we would get from protecting all natural areas from logging and exploitation.

Just one small section states that:

Rethinking forest carbon assessments to account for policy institutions

Monday, June 29, 2015

Originally published at: 

There has been extensive debate about whether the sustainable use of forests (forest management aimed at producing a sustainable yield of timber or other products) results in superior climate outcomes to conservation (maintenance or enhancement of conservation values without commercial harvesting)

Hollow tree collapse

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Once the landscape was well endowed with mature large trees and the wildlife that evolved to make use of these trees were numerous. Now they are extremely rare and becoming more threatened with every burn, with every logging operation and a government fearful that a falling tree could mean litigation.

Decline and extinction of Australian mammals

Friday, February 20, 2015

Originally published at: 

This recent scientific report (Jan 2014) shows how Australia’s land mammals have extinctions suffered an  extraordinary rate of extinction. We have lost over 10% of the 273 endemic terrestrial species over the last 200 years compared to only one native land mammal from continental North America going extinct since European settlement.

Effects of fire on terrestrial biodiversity in Gippsland

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Achieving biodiversity objectives can be a challenging aspect of fire management because different flora and fauna species may require varied fire regimes in order to maintain viable populations, and trade-offs may be needed to satisfy other objectives. This report describes major findings of a project investigating the relationships between aspects of fire regimes on selected flora and fauna, using a space-for-time sampling approach. It was undertaken between 2010 and 2012 in two types of mixed-species forest common to East Gippsland in Victoria.

Pages