Science and Reports

As well as all the moral and economic arguments against destroying nature and forests, there are also endless research reports and scientific findings that show our governments are deliberately denying empirical evidence. To deny sound, peer reviewed science is as absurd as declaring the world is flat. Environmental arguments are not merely emotional bleatings as industry likes to portray. The reports cited here are merely the tip of the iceberg currently being ignored for political expedience.

Book review - Flying Dinosaurs: How fearsome reptiles became birds

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Originally published at: 

Wombat Forestcare Newsletter - Issue 36

From the Wombat Forestcare Newsletter - June. With thanks to Tanya Loos

“As you read this, an estimated 400 billion individual feathered dinosaurs, of 10,000 species, can be found on earth, in almost every habitable environment. You need only step outside and look up into the trees and the wide blue skies to find them.”

Large trees under threat: researchers

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Originally published at: 

While much of the focus lately has been the impact humans are having on the largest, and most spectacular reef in the world, slightly inland we are hurting one of our other greatest natural beauties.

Scientists from James Cook University and the Australian National University have released a paper detailing the threat to large, old trees.

DELWP report on Reducing the Effect of Planned Burns on Hollow Bearing Trees

Friday, April 8, 2016

There is inadequate information on the fate of hollow-bearing trees (HBTs) subject to planned burns in Victoria. This study aimed to provide a methodologically robust estimate of the
collapse rate of HBTs in planned burns in the forests of Gippsland. The study’s primary goal was to quantify the impact on HBTs of exposure to a single instance of planned fire; the secondary goal was to provide evidence-based options for managers seeking to reduce this impact.

Rare species are more important than originally believed, according to new research

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Originally published at: 

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.


 

An international team of researchers, including Florida International University (FIU) botanist Christopher Baraloto, is answering the question of just how important these rare species really are. The team's findings were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. According to Baraloto, who serves as director of the FIU International Center for Tropical Botany, rare species are irreplaceable when it comes to the functionality of ecosystems. When they are removed, ecological processes may be altered with cascading consequences for other plants and animals, as well as .

"We measured the ecosystem services provided by each species as determined from their key morphological and physiological features," Baraloto said. "The results of this study are compelling because we find consistent effects of rare reducing the functional diversity of communities across three very different groups of organisms."

The researchers focused on the tropics, where a large proportion of species are rare and high rates of species loss are expected in the near future. They examined stream fish from the Brazilian Amazon, birds from the Australian Wet Tropics, and rainforest trees from French Guiana, where Baraloto has devoted much of his career. To calculate potential impacts from species loss within an ecosystem, the researchers created simulations of species removal, comparing the disruptions caused by the loss of rare species versus more .

For example, the researchers point out the importance of Protium giganteum, a rare species of rainforest tree in French Guiana. The tree has thick leaves and thick bark that provide resistance to drought and fire. These trees help maintain forest cover and other services to mitigate predicted increases in drought and fire intensity that are brought on by climate changes.

Ultimately, it comes down to balance. The disproportionate contributions of rare species can help ecosystems buffer the disturbances currently occurring on the planet. According to the researchers, this reality can no longer be ignored because —while long-valued for their biodiversity and aesthetic values—are even more important than originally believed.

Explore further: Rare species perform unique roles, even in diverse ecosystems

More information: Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/lookup/doi/10.1098/rspb.2016.0084



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-04-rare-species-important-believed.html#jCp

The world's rarest species—both plants and animals—contribute disproportionally to the ecosystems where they reside, according to research published this week. This new information is changing how scientists view rare species, many of which are on the brink of extinction.

Victoria’s giant trees: a contemporary survey

Friday, April 1, 2016

Originally published at: 

The huge base of 'Darejo', Eucalyptus denticulata-14.3m in girth

Victoria's largest tree paper published in the Victorian Naturalist. This recently published paper is a thorough documentation of Victoria's giant trees - and sadly their loss. It suggests the government should protect all trees over 3m diameter or the giants will be lost in our landscape.

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