Other Media

No more lawless logging - email Premier Andrews

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Originally published at: 

Since the late 1990s the logging industry in Victoria has been exempt from adhering to federal environment laws that protect our nationally threatened wildlife.

Image from Goongerah Environment Centre

Only native forest logging gets this special exemption known as a 'regional forest agreement' (RFA)

In February 2017 the East Gippsland RFA will expire.

It should not be extended.

Goongerah Environment Centre, Environment East Gippsland and Fauna and Flora Research Collective are calling on the Victorian government not to extend the East Gippsland RFA and ensure that native forest logging is assessed under federal environment laws in the same way as every other industry.

Join with us by emailing Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews.

Half the world’s ecosystems at risk from habitat loss, and Australia is one of the worst

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Originally published at: 

Habitat loss is the most insidious of all threats facing land-living wildlife, and protected areas like national parks are one of the best ways to combat the destruction. But in research published recently in Conversation Letters, we show that in some places the pace of protected areas isn’t keeping up with the losses.

We found that since 1992, an area of natural habitat two-thirds the size of Australia has been converted to human use (such as farms, logging or cities). Half of the world’s land area is now dominated by humans.

Interpol says corruption in global forestry sector worth $29 billion every year

Friday, December 9, 2016

Originally published at: 

The international police organization Interpol released a report today that highlights the scale of corruption in the global forestry sector as well as the importance of coordinating law enforcement efforts across national boundaries in order to protect forests.

According to the report, the cost of corruption in the global forestry sector is some $29 billion annually. Bribery is the most common form of forestry corruption, followed by fraud, abuse of office, extortion, cronyism, and nepotism.

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