Water and Waterways

Water bandits

Saturday, September 9, 2006

'If the logging industry was an irrigator they would be charged millions for using this water'

Melbourne's catchments are empty, so we're looking at the skies searching for rain. Right idea, but wrong direction. Look at the Thomson dam, and ask why we still allow clearfell logging in its catchment, then look at Steve Bracks and ask him.

Dam good decision

Saturday, September 9, 2006

The Victorian Farmers Federation (VFF) and the National Party has criticised the Bracks Government for plans to ban new dams on 18 Victorian rivers. Under the plan, the Snowy, Mitchell, Genoa, Aberfeldy, Thomson, Bemm and Upper Buchan rivers could not be dammed. The VFF said it was wasting water that would just go out to sea. They see our rivers as just bothersome big drainage ditches.

Logging and the Thomson Water Catchment

Saturday, August 26, 2006

The Thomson Reservoir is situated along the eastern escarpments of Mount Baw Baw and carries approximately 60 percent of Melbourne’s water storage capacity. It is surrounded by 48,700 hectares of forested catchment that includes the northern and eastern slopes of Mount Baw Baw, the southern slopes of Mount Matlock on the Great Dividing Range and the western slopes of the Aberfeldy Range. The Thomson is the largest of four major water supply catchments for Melbourneand is located within the Central Highlands of Victoria.

BASSLINK ... Engineers' wet dream turns to a nightmare

Thursday, June 1, 2006

A giant underwater electrical umbilical chord now joins Tasmania and Victoria. As of late April, we can now buy Tasmania's 'clean Hydro power', or if their wood fired electricity generators get going, power from their incinerated old growth forests. They can also buy our cheap, off-peak, dirty coal power and save their own to sell to us at times of high demand.

Thirsty plantations drinking us dry

Friday, January 6, 2006

A global study has shown the obvious - that timber plantations have a mixed effect on the environment.

While they can help to counteract greenhouse gas emissions, stabilize soil, and moderate strong winds, they can also stop streams flowing.

Dairy and sheep farmers in the Green Triangle area of Victoria and South Australia say they have noticed that water run off onto their properties has been reduced after the establishment of timber plantations nearby.

Plantations cause drought

Friday, January 6, 2006

A global study has shown the obvious - that timber plantations have a mixed effect on the environment.

While they can help to counteract greenhouse gas emissions, stabilize soil and moderate strong winds, they can also stop streams flowing.

Dairy and sheep farmers in the Green Triangle area of Victoria and South Australia say they have noticed that water run-off onto their properties has been reduced after the establishment of timber plantations nearby.

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