Threatened Species

Council adopts a lose-lose stance on threatened Flying Foxes

Friday, June 23, 2017

The East Gippsland Shire Council (EGSC) appears determined to destroy the roosting site of a colony of the threatened Grey-headed Flying Foxes. This is a major blunder of immense ignorance and bloody mindedness that will likely result in an even bigger problem for the council, possibly with a million dollar ‘fix-it’ bill and an even more threatened, threatened species.

During 2015 and 2016, the colony remained at the site all winter with females staying to birth their young – defined as a maternal breeding colony which gives this site even more significance.

Flying Foxes – an economic ‘golden egg’ for Bairnsdale or a million dollar back-fire?

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

There could be a win-win solution for the current controversy over the nationally significant colony of Flying Foxes along the Mitchell River, say local environment groups.

A failure if the council proceeds with habitat destruction could cost ratepayers over a million dollars going by other documented failures and the lessons learned. The second stage of habitat removal and dispersal is planned to begin in the next week or two.

Greater Glider – recently listed as threatened

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Bad news: The Greater Glider, Australia’s largest (and fluffiest) gliding possum is under threat of extinction.

Good news: It has recently been added to the threatened list of Victoria’s Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act (FFGA)

After decades of decline and zero government interest or surveys, the clear evidence is that local extinctions of the Greater Glider are happening. It’s still in decline due to ongoing threats like clearfelling its habitat, planned burns and destruction of hollow-bearing trees that are essential for its survival. Like the Koala, the Greater Glider eats gum leaves and has a small home range. It won’t leave after its home area is cut down. The glider has an affinity for its known trees and hollows. It starves or is killed by predators once its forest or trees are destroyed.

Calls to end logging’s legal exemption from federal environment law

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

This week a coalition of 25 environment groups is urging Premier Daniel Andrews to abandon his plans to extend the legal exemption given to the native forest logging industry in East Gippsland.

The East Gippsland Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) is a 20-year arrangement between state and federal governments that gives special immunity to the logging industry from Federal environment laws - laws that should protect nationally listed threatened species. 

The plan to prepare plans – the end is nigh

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Having a list of rare and endangered species is not much good if there is no binding plan to protect them.

The Long nosed Potoroo (Potorous tridactylus tridactyl)

As a result of the legal proceedings initiated in the Supreme Court on 21 May 2013 by EDO on behalf of EEG, the then environment Department, DEPI, agreed to immediately prepare protection plans called Action Statements, for four of about 700 listed species (over half did not have Action Statements). DEPI is legally obliged under section 19 of the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act to produce Action Statements as soon as possible after listing.

The species we chose to force the government to act were the Glossy Black-Cockatoo, the Long-Nosed Potoroo, the Large Brown Tree Frog and the Eastern She-Oak Skink. This was a start but we soon discovered that these plans can often be little more than motherhood statements.

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