Old Growth

FSC undermined by backing logging of 600-year-old trees

Thursday, October 23, 2014

One of the giant trees subject to logging in the now-FSC-certified Northcliffe forest.

The standards of the world's leading timber certifying body, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), are being questioned after one of its British auditors gave an environmental tick of approval to log forests containing 600-year-old trees in Western Australia.

The WA Government’s logging agency, the Forest Products Commission (FPC), has secured FSC certification from Soil Association Woodmark for FPC’s logging operations in the tall eucalypt Karri forests in the state’s south-west. These forests are also home to at least 15 threatened species including Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos, Mainland Quokkas and Western Quolls.

Room for Improvement

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

just making some room for improvement

VicForests has a snowball’s hope in hell of gaining the green tick of approval from the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), an international wood certification body.

It had a preliminary audit carried out on its logging management and it failed dismally. This didn’t stop it from claiming in a media release that the auditors recognised the wonderful job they do (!?)

Carbon accumulation in large trees

Thursday, March 27, 2014

This research counters the logging industry argument that a young post-logging regrowth forest (and plantations) accumulate more carbon than a natural mature forest. It highlights the importance of old large trees in the carbon cycle.

Read the research PDF at 2014_March-tree-growth_Nature.pdf


New policies for old trees - averting a global crisis in a keystone ecological structure

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Large old trees are critical organisms and ecological structures in forests, woodlands, savannas, and agricultural and urban environments. They play many essential ecological roles ranging from the storage of large amounts of carbon to the provision of key habitats for wildlife. Some of these roles cannot be replaced by other structures. Large old trees are disproportionately vulnerable to loss in many ecosystems worldwide as a result of accelerated rates of mortality, impaired recruitment, or both.