Regional Forest Agreements Media

Those Logging Our Forests Can't See The Wood For The Trees

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Originally published at: 

We must return federal environmental protections to native forests.

"When an area of our pristine, irreplaceable forest is logged, it is cut down and bulldozed." Fairfax Media via Getty Images

Last Friday was a chance to restore balance to the way our native forests are managed -- a chance that was wasted.

Over the past 20 years, areas designated for logging have been exempted from Australia's national environment laws. Even open cut mines don't get that sort of special treatment. These logging laws, known as 'Regional Forest Agreements', were meant to protect jobs and protect the environment. They have failed on both counts.

No more lawless logging - email Premier Andrews

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Originally published at: 

Since the late 1990s the logging industry in Victoria has been exempt from adhering to federal environment laws that protect our nationally threatened wildlife.

Image from Goongerah Environment Centre

Only native forest logging gets this special exemption known as a 'regional forest agreement' (RFA)

In February 2017 the East Gippsland RFA will expire.

It should not be extended.

Goongerah Environment Centre, Environment East Gippsland and Fauna and Flora Research Collective are calling on the Victorian government not to extend the East Gippsland RFA and ensure that native forest logging is assessed under federal environment laws in the same way as every other industry.

Join with us by emailing Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews.

Call To End Special Treatment For The Logging Industry

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Originally published at: 

Victorian conservationists who’ve saved a colony of threatened Greater Gliders from loggers say the latest victory is further evidence the Federal Government should tear up the Regional Forestry Agreements, which exempt native forest logging from national environmental law.

Regional Forest Agreements: Nice idea but total failure!

Friday, May 13, 2016

Originally published at: 

RFAs were designed to reduce conflict but tensions still flare up regularly. Photo: Dave Gallan

RFAs were designed to reduce conflict but tensions still flare up regularly. Photo: Dave Gallan

On Wednesday this week, the National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) launched a new report entitled Regional Forest Agreements in NSW. Have they achieved their aims? In short, the answer is no — far from it, writes Dr Oisín Sweeney.

REGIONAL FOREST Agreements (RFAs) are deals between the Commonwealth and State governments that allow for logging in public native forests.

There are ten RFAs currently active in four states: Western Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and NSW. They begin to expire from 2017 with East Gippsland and Tasmania first.

Our native forest regulations need to move with the times

Monday, July 20, 2015

Originally published at: 

The aftermath of a regen burn at a central highlands logging coupe

The RFAs governing forestry activities have failed to protect both the industry and the environment, says Rice. Credit: ABC Environment

The rules governing our native forests, RFAs, were drawn up nearly 20 years ago. They need to be thoroughly reviewed and updated to reflect the changes in the forestry industry that have occurred in the last two decades.

Forestry agreements need a full overhaul, not just a tick and flick

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Originally published at: 

Regional Forest Agreements were supposed to give certainty to both loggers and conservationists. But they haven’t. Pengo/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY

For almost two decades, the management of forests in parts of Western Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and New South Wales has been underpinned by state and federal Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs), defined as “20-year plans for the conservation and sustainable management of Australia’s native forests”.

The broad aim of RFAs is to “provide certainty for forest-based industries, forest-dependent communities and conservation”. RFAs are now up for renewal, and it would certainly be in industry advocates' interest for them to be simply “ticked off”, without the critical scrutiny that is clearly warranted.

The RFAs need to be fully reviewed, not just renewed, because they have had highly perverse outcomes – rather than helping to ease environmental problems, the agreements have actually worsened them in some cases.

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