Politics

No more lawless logging - email Premier Andrews

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Originally published at: 

Since the late 1990s the logging industry in Victoria has been exempt from adhering to federal environment laws that protect our nationally threatened wildlife.

Image from Goongerah Environment Centre

Only native forest logging gets this special exemption known as a 'regional forest agreement' (RFA)

In February 2017 the East Gippsland RFA will expire.

It should not be extended.

Goongerah Environment Centre, Environment East Gippsland and Fauna and Flora Research Collective are calling on the Victorian government not to extend the East Gippsland RFA and ensure that native forest logging is assessed under federal environment laws in the same way as every other industry.

Join with us by emailing Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews.

Creation of Great Forest National Park could hand inner Melbourne seats to the Greens

Sunday, November 27, 2016

Originally published at: 

VOTERS in three inner-Melbourne electorates overwhelmingly want the Victorian Government to stop logging native forest in favour of the proposed 355,000-hectare Great Forest National Park.

Polling conducted by Lonergan Research for the Greens shows that 96 per cent of voters in Richmond, Brunswick and Northcote believe the State Government has an obligation to protect Victoria’s native forest.

More than one third of respondents said the decision to create a national park, from Kinglake across the Yarra Ranges to Mt Baw Baw and north to Lake Eildon, would have a large influence on their vote

Logging plan puts squeeze on Victoria's high value native forests

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Originally published at: 

VicForests' timber release plan targets 12,000 hectares of East Gippsland forest. Photo: John Renowden

Victoria has taken the dubious title of being the largest logger of Australian native forest by volume, accounting for around a third of all native forest logged in the country over the past year.

The state government agency VicForests logged more than 1.3 million cubic metres of wood from Victoria's native forests, almost 100,000 cubic metres more than the year before.

Native forests are worth more unlogged, so why are we still cutting them down?

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Originally published at: 

I spent the first four years of my life living in the middle of the forest in southeastern NSW.

Our log cabin was at the end of a dirt road, surrounded by stringybark, spotted gum and the sounds of kookaburras and lyre birds.

Illustration: John Shakespeare

Wombat holes and lichen-covered boulders dotted the hillside and the creek ran cold and clear, steeped red-brown with tea tree.

After we moved to the city, we returned most years to visit family. Every trip more and more of the surrounding bushland was cleared and replanted with radiata pine.

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