Logging and Clearfell

No more lawless logging - email Premier Andrews

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Originally published at: 

Since the late 1990s the logging industry in Victoria has been exempt from adhering to federal environment laws that protect our nationally threatened wildlife.

Image from Goongerah Environment Centre

Only native forest logging gets this special exemption known as a 'regional forest agreement' (RFA)

In February 2017 the East Gippsland RFA will expire.

It should not be extended.

Goongerah Environment Centre, Environment East Gippsland and Fauna and Flora Research Collective are calling on the Victorian government not to extend the East Gippsland RFA and ensure that native forest logging is assessed under federal environment laws in the same way as every other industry.

Join with us by emailing Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews.

Half the world’s ecosystems at risk from habitat loss, and Australia is one of the worst

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Originally published at: 

Habitat loss is the most insidious of all threats facing land-living wildlife, and protected areas like national parks are one of the best ways to combat the destruction. But in research published recently in Conversation Letters, we show that in some places the pace of protected areas isn’t keeping up with the losses.

We found that since 1992, an area of natural habitat two-thirds the size of Australia has been converted to human use (such as farms, logging or cities). Half of the world’s land area is now dominated by humans.

VicForests logs Powerful Owl habitat for …. firewood?

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Originally published at: 

Powerful Owl (Image Duncan Fraser)

You’ve got to be joking, right? VicForests are spruiking the importance of  firewood as a sustainable product from Parlour’s Creek coupe. Is firewood really such an important part of their business model?

Which kind of means that they’re logging Powerful Owl and Greater Glider habitat for firewood!

Logging plan puts squeeze on Victoria's high value native forests

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Originally published at: 

VicForests' timber release plan targets 12,000 hectares of East Gippsland forest. Photo: John Renowden

Victoria has taken the dubious title of being the largest logger of Australian native forest by volume, accounting for around a third of all native forest logged in the country over the past year.

The state government agency VicForests logged more than 1.3 million cubic metres of wood from Victoria's native forests, almost 100,000 cubic metres more than the year before.

Native forests are worth more unlogged, so why are we still cutting them down?

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Originally published at: 

I spent the first four years of my life living in the middle of the forest in southeastern NSW.

Our log cabin was at the end of a dirt road, surrounded by stringybark, spotted gum and the sounds of kookaburras and lyre birds.

Illustration: John Shakespeare

Wombat holes and lichen-covered boulders dotted the hillside and the creek ran cold and clear, steeped red-brown with tea tree.

After we moved to the city, we returned most years to visit family. Every trip more and more of the surrounding bushland was cleared and replanted with radiata pine.

Logging starts in Strathbogies

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Originally published at: 

The natural beauty of the Strathbogie State Forest.

After years of discussion and campaigning, environment groups feel like they are losing the battle to protect Strathbogie State Forest with VicForests beginning its logging operation.

Euroa Environment Group and Strathbogie State Forest Group want a thorough assessment of the forest values to establish how much forest is available for sustainable logging and ensure it does not encroach on native species.

Native Forest logging: we can do better than this

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Originally published at: 

Pretty much everyone is sick of the slogans used by the major parties in the election. But jobs, growth and fairness remain pertinent to the current situation in the native forests of Victoria's Central Highlands. There, the reality is that native forest logging provides few jobs; it is not a growth industry – its resource availability is shrinking. It is not fair that taxpayers have to subsidise an industry worth far less to the economy than alternative uses of the forest.

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