Fires and Burning

Greater gliders: fears of 'catastrophic' consequences from logging in Victoria

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Originally published at: 

Gliders listed as threatened by both state and federal governments, but they are not protected by legislation

Greater gliders are threatened by logging in the central highlands of Victoria. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Logging has begun in trees inhabited by the threatened greater gliders in a forest also inhabited by Victoria’s faunal emblem, the threatened Leadbeater’s possum.

Wildlife killed by department burn in fauna reserve

Monday, July 17, 2017

Originally published at: 

A planned burn near Stratford had a sad result for a colony of rare New Holland mice.

THE state environment department has defended its fire management practice which led to the incineration of a colony of rare New Holland mice.

In early May, Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, and Forest Five Management Victoria carried out a burn in the Providence Ponds Flora and Fauna Reserve near Stratford.

The reserve is one of only three Victorian places where the endangered New Holland mouse lives.

Sorry state for threatened gliders in Victoria

Monday, June 5, 2017

Originally published at: 

Background

Greater Glider populations are suffering across Australia. This is especially so in Victoria where populations in the Central Highlands and East Gippsland are in distress due to – among other reasons – fire and logging eating away at their habitat.

Feral cats, foxes able to easily target native animals after fires burn protective cover

Friday, June 2, 2017

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Foxes are travelling long distances in arid areas to hunt native animals bereft of cover after fires. (Supplied: Bronwyn Hradsky)

Introduced cats and foxes are finding native animals easily exposed by a loss of habitat due to fire and it is pushing some species to extinction.

Research using infrared cameras and GPS trackers is showing the feral animals cover more ground in greater numbers after fires and their diet includes more native species.

Victoria's logging industry faces supply dilemma

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Originally published at: 

In 2009, 75,000 ha of Victoria’s forests were burnt in the Black Saturday bushfires. Over a 3rd of that was forests earmarked for the logging industry. The prospect of bushfires are never calculated into long term planning or log contracts with mills. Couple this situation with other bushfires and a history of overlogging and the result is unprecedented environmental destruction and habitat loss, but also a huge shortfall in the logs available to the logging industry.  

In 2013 the Heyfield mill knew their supply would be cut back in 2017.

Responses of invasive predators and native prey to a prescribed forest fire

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Originally published at: 

Fire shapes biome distribution and community composition worldwide, and is extensively used as a management tool in flammable landscapes. There is growing concern, however, that fire could increase the vulnerability of native fauna to invasive predators.

Sydney air pollution from scheduled burn led to 14 premature deaths, researchers find

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Originally published at: 

Aren’t we told planned burns are done to save lives? How come so many people are dying and suffering from the smoke they generate then? In November, 14 people died from the burns smoke that blanketed Sydney. Many more suffered asthma attacks and were hospitalised. How long has this been hidden from the public, with health records kept under wraps?  [Ed]

Photo: Sydney Harbour was shrouded in smoke during hazard reduction burns in May. (Supplied: Stephen Coates)

Up to 14 people died prematurely due to smoke from a hazard reduction burn in Sydney, new research has found, prompting calls for better warnings.

The secret life of echidnas reveals a world-class digger vital to our ecosystems

Thursday, October 20, 2016

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Echidnas may not seem the most active of animals. Waddling around, they spend much of their time dozing and hiding. But in research published today in the Journal of Experimental Biology, we show that echidnas dig huge amounts of soil, and play a crucial role in Australia’s ecosystems.

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