Invasive Species

Feral cats, foxes able to easily target native animals after fires burn protective cover

Friday, June 2, 2017

Originally published at: 

Foxes are travelling long distances in arid areas to hunt native animals bereft of cover after fires. (Supplied: Bronwyn Hradsky)

Introduced cats and foxes are finding native animals easily exposed by a loss of habitat due to fire and it is pushing some species to extinction.

Research using infrared cameras and GPS trackers is showing the feral animals cover more ground in greater numbers after fires and their diet includes more native species.

Responses of invasive predators and native prey to a prescribed forest fire

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Originally published at: 

Fire shapes biome distribution and community composition worldwide, and is extensively used as a management tool in flammable landscapes. There is growing concern, however, that fire could increase the vulnerability of native fauna to invasive predators.

Feral species inquiry

Monday, August 1, 2016

In Victoria, a parliamentary enquiry has been set up to look at controlling invasive species on crown land. EEG is concerned there is too much focus on shooters and National Parks. Allowing shooting organisations to kill deer or foxes in the Alps or parks will hardly put a dint in their numbers (but will gain a few votes).

What’s needed is serious political will to fund research to progress alternative methods of humane culling of ALL ferals including cats.

Cat tracking program makes owners re-think pets' behaviour and how they manage their moggies

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Originally published at: 

Willie is one of seven cats living with Stephen Barnes in Lithgow, where the cat tracking program took place. ABC Central West: Melanie Pearce

The old nursery rhyme may have questioned where the pussy cat had been, but a new research program reveals that just like the moggy that went to London, Australian domestic cats love to roam.

Using global positioning system (GPS) devices, the program used at Lithgow, in central-west New South Wales, tracked the daily movements of a group of pet cats.

The results shocked some of their owners.

We all live downstream – it’s time to restore our freshwater ecosystems

Monday, May 9, 2016

Originally published at: 

In East Gippsland our freshwater ecosystems are threatened by clearfelling in most catchments, by industrial and agricultural pollution and excess nutrients, fire fighting chemicals broadcast over large areas, all of which end up in the Lakes system that is also threatened by deepening of the entrance at Lakes Entrance. This is changing a brackish-freshwater system to a marine system, killing of the unique suite of species that evolved in these Lakes. The fact that in East Gippsland we are still seeing new species of fish and crays discovered shows how little we know what is in the water, let alone how it all works. [Ed]

Moo-ve along: livestock are one of many threats to Australian freshwater ecosystems. Mick Stanic/Flickr,

Freshwater covers a tiny area of the planet’s surface, but is vital for our economies, environment and, of course, our survival. Yet freshwater is also among the most threatened ecosystems, where wildlife has declined faster than in the oceans or on land.

Pages