Fires and Burning


See our PDF publication "An illustrated Guide to the RFA"
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Will forest shredders stop fires?

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Putting VicForests as the overseer of these trials has discredited the trial’s integrity right from the start.

Trials are currently underway to assess ‘mechanical fuel reduction’ in our public forests. The details are sketchy but seem to be based on a US practice of using heavy machinery with mulching/shredding capacity to run through native forests turning everything in the lower and mid story into mulch or shredded material. Trees are taken out and sold to mills. In the US this method of ‘fuel reduction’ is driven by the commercial need for bio-char, but is dressed up as ‘fire-safety’. In Australia, burning forests as a method of ‘fuel reduction’ remains an unproven science as a method of keeping communities safe, despite its wide spread use. However there is much research that shows it can be useless to counterproductive and extremely damaging for the natural ecology and wildlife of areas.

Victoria's logging industry faces supply dilemma

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Originally published at: 

In 2009, 75,000 ha of Victoria’s forests were burnt in the Black Saturday bushfires. Over a 3rd of that was forests earmarked for the logging industry. The prospect of bushfires are never calculated into long term planning or log contracts with mills. Couple this situation with other bushfires and a history of overlogging and the result is unprecedented environmental destruction and habitat loss, but also a huge shortfall in the logs available to the logging industry.  

In 2013 the Heyfield mill knew their supply would be cut back in 2017.

Responses of invasive predators and native prey to a prescribed forest fire

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Originally published at: 

Fire shapes biome distribution and community composition worldwide, and is extensively used as a management tool in flammable landscapes. There is growing concern, however, that fire could increase the vulnerability of native fauna to invasive predators.

Sydney air pollution from scheduled burn led to 14 premature deaths, researchers find

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Originally published at: 

Aren’t we told planned burns are done to save lives? How come so many people are dying and suffering from the smoke they generate then? In November, 14 people died from the burns smoke that blanketed Sydney. Many more suffered asthma attacks and were hospitalised. How long has this been hidden from the public, with health records kept under wraps?  [Ed]

Photo: Sydney Harbour was shrouded in smoke during hazard reduction burns in May. (Supplied: Stephen Coates)

Up to 14 people died prematurely due to smoke from a hazard reduction burn in Sydney, new research has found, prompting calls for better warnings.

The secret life of echidnas reveals a world-class digger vital to our ecosystems

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Originally published at: 

Echidnas may not seem the most active of animals. Waddling around, they spend much of their time dozing and hiding. But in research published today in the Journal of Experimental Biology, we show that echidnas dig huge amounts of soil, and play a crucial role in Australia’s ecosystems.

Burning off our biodiversity

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Up in smoke. Researchers at the Australian National University calculate that hollows of this size take more than 300 years to form

The Clarence Environment Centre is also witnessing and questioning the arson being carried out in their local area. The immense damage being done to wildlife and ecosystems, under guise of ‘public safety’ is galling. So many of our rare and threatened wildlife are dependent on large old trees with hollows for nesting and sheltering. 

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