Fires and Burning


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Sydney air pollution from scheduled burn led to 14 premature deaths, researchers find

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Originally published at: 

Aren’t we told planned burns are done to save lives? How come so many people are dying and suffering from the smoke they generate then? In November, 14 people died from the burns smoke that blanketed Sydney. Many more suffered asthma attacks and were hospitalised. How long has this been hidden from the public, with health records kept under wraps?  [Ed]

Photo: Sydney Harbour was shrouded in smoke during hazard reduction burns in May. (Supplied: Stephen Coates)

Up to 14 people died prematurely due to smoke from a hazard reduction burn in Sydney, new research has found, prompting calls for better warnings.

The secret life of echidnas reveals a world-class digger vital to our ecosystems

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Originally published at: 

Echidnas may not seem the most active of animals. Waddling around, they spend much of their time dozing and hiding. But in research published today in the Journal of Experimental Biology, we show that echidnas dig huge amounts of soil, and play a crucial role in Australia’s ecosystems.

Burning off our biodiversity

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Up in smoke. Researchers at the Australian National University calculate that hollows of this size take more than 300 years to form

The Clarence Environment Centre is also witnessing and questioning the arson being carried out in their local area. The immense damage being done to wildlife and ecosystems, under guise of ‘public safety’ is galling. So many of our rare and threatened wildlife are dependent on large old trees with hollows for nesting and sheltering. 

DELWP report on Reducing the Effect of Planned Burns on Hollow Bearing Trees

Friday, April 8, 2016

There is inadequate information on the fate of hollow-bearing trees (HBTs) subject to planned burns in Victoria. This study aimed to provide a methodologically robust estimate of the
collapse rate of HBTs in planned burns in the forests of Gippsland. The study’s primary goal was to quantify the impact on HBTs of exposure to a single instance of planned fire; the secondary goal was to provide evidence-based options for managers seeking to reduce this impact.

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