Economics of logging

RFA’s – just a giant legal loophole to destroy forests

Friday, May 13, 2016

700 pages and not one reason to keep logging forestsEast Gippsland was the first region to have its forests signed away under the appalling logging industry ‘free-for-all’ called the Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs). Its life of 20 years is about to expire next year and MUST NOT be rolled over for another 2 decades of legally exempt pillaging. Many reports have shown it was a massive failure for all but the export woodchip industry.

Regional Forest Agreements: Nice idea but total failure!

Friday, May 13, 2016

Originally published at: 

RFAs were designed to reduce conflict but tensions still flare up regularly. Photo: Dave Gallan

RFAs were designed to reduce conflict but tensions still flare up regularly. Photo: Dave Gallan

On Wednesday this week, the National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) launched a new report entitled Regional Forest Agreements in NSW. Have they achieved their aims? In short, the answer is no — far from it, writes Dr Oisín Sweeney.

REGIONAL FOREST Agreements (RFAs) are deals between the Commonwealth and State governments that allow for logging in public native forests.

There are ten RFAs currently active in four states: Western Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and NSW. They begin to expire from 2017 with East Gippsland and Tasmania first.

NSW native forests worth more if left standing: Australia Institute report

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Originally published at: 

Loading a logging truck in a south-east NSW logging coupe.

An economic analysis by The Australia Institute claims that native forest logging in NSW lost $79 million over the last seven years, but could be making a $40 million yearly profit if left standing and allowed access to the Federal Government's Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF).

Time to cut losses not native trees, as deficit climbs, Australia Institute says

Monday, March 21, 2016

Originally published at: 

Logging of native forests has cost NSW taxpayers $78 million over the past six years for a declining industry that is also a primary risk for the state's rising number of threatened species, according to a report by The Australia Institute.

The losses have been clocked up by the hardwood unit of the Forestry Corporation of NSW in the six years to the 2014-15 financial year. About 95 per cent of the division's revenue comes from logging in native forests rather than hardwood plantations, the report said.

VicForests' dividend - the truth!

Friday, November 13, 2015

invoice to VicForests from the Victorian public 2015

View invoice (PDF) here

Opening VicForests 2014 - 2015 Annual Report, the corporation's chairman, Gordon Davies, makes the proud assertion that "These results have enabled us to pay increasing dividends to the Government, providing a financial return to the people of Victoria in addition to all of the social benefits the native timber industry provides". This is reinforced by a similar claim in the CEO's Report, "Our ongoing positive financial position has enabled us to pay dividends to our shareholder, the Treasurer - $250,000 based on the 2012-13 results, $765,000 on the 2013-14 results and a proposed $1.5 million based on this year’s results". 

In case anybody has missed it, "Payment of a dividend of $765,000 based on 2013-14 results", is reiterated as a 'Highlight' of the Annual Report. 

These misleading claims appear to be deliberately repeated in order to imply that a dividend was paid during the reporting year.

VicForests – 11 years of loss-loss

Friday, November 13, 2015

 

VicForests is crowing that this 2014/15 year, it made a profit of $4.68 million.

And for the first time in eight years, a dividend of $765 000 was paid to the people of Victoria via the Treasurer and VicForests is still thinking about paying last year’s owed dividend of $1.5 million. Whether we’ll see it is another thing. On a backlogged debt of $60 million, it’s a start. VicForests claims it’s paid a return to Victorian’s of $5 million (in 2006 and 2007). $5 million represents a very small recompense to the state for $871 million worth of publicly owned wood pulp and timber from our native forests.

Native forests can help hit emissions targets – if we leave them alone

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Originally published at: 

The debate over native forest logging has been sparked once again, partly by the government’s successful push for wood burning to be included in the revamped Renewable Energy Target.

However, the disagreement over the best way to manage Australia’s 9.4 million hectares of public native forest is thrown into sharp relief by analysis showing that ending native forest logging, and completing the the industry’s shift into plantations instead, would get Australia much of the way to its greenhouse gas emissions reductions target.

Australia's 'dirtiest' power station considers 'clean energy' biomass burning option

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Originally published at: 

With recent changes to the renewable energy target, the burning of native forest wood waste can once again earn credits for generating clean energy, but there's dispute about whether burning native forest waste for energy is 'carbon neutral'. Background Briefing reports.

Pages